What Does The Fair Housing Act Say?

What does Fair Housing do?

Fair housing is the right to choose housing free from unlawful discrimination.

Federal, state and local fair housing laws protect people from discrimination in housing transactions such as rentals, sales, lending, and insurance..

What are punitive damages in fair housing?

Punitive damages are paid to the victim of discrimination. A civil penalty is a monetary fine paid to the government. Attorney fees and costs can, in most cases, be ordered by prevailing plaintiffs in fair housing cases.

What does the Fair Housing Act cover?

The Fair Housing Act is a federal law enacted in 1968 that prohibits discrimination in the purchase, sale, rental, or financing of housing—private or public—based on race, skin color, sex, nationality, or religion. The statute has been amended several times, including in 1988 to add disability and family status.

Is the Fair Housing Act effective?

The Fair Housing Act has the potential to be one of the most powerful laws in the country, but its effectiveness has been stymied by entrenched policies and practices that perpetuate discrimination and segregation; ineffective enforcement by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Department of …

Who investigates fair housing complaints?

Office of Fair Housing and Equal OpportunityStep 1: File a Complaint The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) enforces the FHA. HUD’s Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (FHEO) is responsible for receiving and investigating fair housing complaints.

What are the requirements of the Fair Housing Act?

It is illegal to discriminate in the sale or rental of housing, including against individuals seeking a mortgage or housing assistance, or in other housing-related activities. The Fair Housing Act prohibits this discrimination because of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, and disability.

How much can you sue for housing discrimination?

It’s fair to be angry and scared—the direct federal fines for violations of the Fair Housing Act are usually $17,000 per violation; total settlements on race, familial status, age and sex discrimination cases often reach well into the six figures—but those overwhelming emotions are why you should go straight to your …

Who can be held liable for a violation of fair housing law?

The owners or officers of a corporation generally may be held liable for Fair Housing violations only if they directed or controlled the person with respect to the unlawful act.

What happens if you violate the Fair Housing Act?

Civil penalties may be levied up to $16,000 for a first violation and $65,000 for future violations. In cases where the Justice Department is involved civil penalties can be even more and go up to $100,000. Punitive damages may also be awarded by federal courts.

Why is the Fair Housing Act so important?

It seeks to ensure that nobody is discriminated against in property transactions on the basis of his or her protected class. The Importance of Fair Housing Act lies in the fact that brokers, sellers, lenders, and insurers cannot adopt discriminatory policies against people in the protected class.

What is the Fair Housing Act of 1988?

The Fair Housing Amendments Act (FHAA) was signed into law on September 13, 1988, and became effective on March 12, 1989. The Act amends Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin in housing sales, rentals or financing.

Which of the following is not covered by the Fair Housing Act?

Race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin. Although some interest groups have tried to lobby to include sexual orientation and marital status, these aren’t protected classes under the federal law, but are sometimes protected by certain local state fair housing laws.